Issue 37

From Mild to Wild: A Kayak Adventure’s Guide to the Sanctuary Coast

From Mild to Wild: A Kayak Adventure’s Guide to the Sanctuary Coast

By Roger Schumann “Renowned for its world-class scenery, the Nor Cal coast spans three national marine sanctuaries, two wilderness areas and a national seashore. It’s no accident this area has received so much protection—it is among the most spectacular and wildlife-rich marine habitats on the planet.” – Guide to Sea Kayaking Central & Northern California. Bordering not only our collective backdoor, our local Sanctuary Coast also borders what is essentially the world’s largest wilderness area, the Pacific Ocean. The vast majority of local paddlers are content paddling within the relative safety of wildlife-rich sloughs and harbors like those around Elkhorn Slough, Pt. Reyes, and San Francisco Bay. The promise of remote beaches, hidden coves and sea caves, however, beckons to those willing to develop the paddling skills and sea savvy to venture beyond. Armed with a little knowledge of sheltered launch sites, local wind patterns, tides, and some basic safety...
Surfing El Salvador’s “Wild East”

Surfing El Salvador’s “Wild East”

By Thomas S. Garlinghouse • Photos by Dan Mottern Never in his wildest dreams did William Koplitz think he’d find himself in a Third World hospital nursing multiple gunshot wounds. That he was in just such a position struck him as surreal. But both wounds, the one on his hand and the one on the right side his face, brought him back to reality. He was lucky to be alive. He had come with his brother, John, to El Salvador to surf. On a rare flat day they decided to take a trip into the interior to visit one of the country’s famous volcanoes. They hired a driver and by noon they were standing on the rim of San Salvador Volcano, marveling at the incredible vista. On the way back, they came upon two men standing in the middle of a narrow dirt road. One of the men brandished...
Heliocentric: Love the Sun without Getting Burned

Heliocentric: Love the Sun without Getting Burned

by Christa Fraser Most people know the basics of protecting themselves from the sun’s ill effects—wear sunscreen, avoid the sun between 10 AM and 3 PM, and avoid using baby oil while lying on a reflective mat. But there are a lot of sun protection myths out there. Since the rate of skin cancer in the US is now about 1 person in 35, it’s important to know the truth about sun safety. Dr. James Beckett, a Santa Cruz dermatologist specializing in sun protection for outdoor athletes, helps us dispel these myths so we can play ‘til the sun goes down without weathering and leathering before our time. Myth #1: I don’t need sunscreen if it’s cloudy out Ultraviolet radiation comes in three forms: UVC, which thankfully is absorbed by the atmosphere or else life as we know it wouldn’t exist (life forms can’t survive its deadly rays);...
Go Hike A Rock!

Go Hike A Rock!

Story and photos by Rick Deutsch Of all the possible adventures in Yosemite National Park, possibly the most spectacular is the hike from the valley floor to the top of 8,842 foot Half Dome. The picturesque monolith is the most climbed mountain in the Sierra Nevada, with about 50,000 ascents per year. Reach the top and you’ll understand why so many love the rugged challenge. Yes, the view from the top IS incredible. Still, this is a big hike–a full ten to twelve hour day for most, comprising about sixteen miles round trip. The final 425 feet to the top is a harrowing climb of the nearly 45 degree granite shoulder of Half Dome. This is accomplished with the aid of two steel cable handrails. The National Park Service puts up the famous “cables” on Half Dome for the duration of the summer – usually early June until mid...
From Molokai with Music

From Molokai with Music

The 2006 QuickSilverEdition Molokai to Oahu 32-Mile Paddleboard Race By Ryan Pingree Ryan Pingree carries his board up the beach after finishing the grueling 32-mile Quiksilveredition Molokai to Oahu Paddleboard Race, Sunday, July 30, 2006, at Hawaii Kai, Oahu, Hawaii. He paddled for six hours, 51 minutes and 21 seconds, after leaving Molokai. Photo Credit: Bob Cunningham/CunninghamPhotos.com I participated in the 10th Anniversary QuickSilverEdition Molokai to Oahu 32-Mile Paddleboard Race last July. The race, which began at Kaluakoi, Molokai and finished at Hawaii Kai, Oahu, is the world championship of long-distance paddleboard racing. A field of 128 paddlers struggled across the blue waters of the Kaiwi Channel, the highest number in the race’s history. Of these 128 paddlers, 36 watermen paddled alone. I was one of them. I trained for over a year for this one day. What follows is my race journal, synchronized to the music I was listening...
X
- Enter Your Location -
- or -