Issue 76

EDITOR’S NOTE: Wall Street Rednecks

EDITOR’S NOTE: Wall Street Rednecks

Why PG&E is the best argument for solar power In lieu of a normal editor’s note, I’ve decided to write a diatribe against PG&E. Yes, I acknowledge that ranting and raving about a multi-billion dollar corporation is not necessarily pertinent to the subject matter at hand – namely outdoor winter activities – but as the editor I can occasionally take certain liberties. Every time I look at my utility bill I want to kick something. Why is the cost of basic electricity and gas rapidly increasing year after year? What percentage of these rate increases are attributable to mismanagement and corruption over at PG&E? Why aren’t those solar panels that I have been dreaming about installed on my roof yet? PG&E could be writing me a check every month instead of the other way around! Now PG&E is looking at a possible four billion dollar fine for its liability...
The Angry Singlespeeder: That Tingling Sensation

The Angry Singlespeeder: That Tingling Sensation

By Kurt Gensheimer The leaves are off the trees, the sun is setting before you get home from work and the biting cold forces winter jackets from the depths of your closet. But for most people who live in California, it’s not really winter; at least according to the millions of other poor bastards who are plowing three feet of snow from their driveway while the thermometer reads 20 below. While most of America is preparing for a deep, dark winter filled with frozen pipes, icy sidewalk injuries, mild frostbite, marathon snow shoveling sessions and weeks without seeing the sun, many Californians will go about their lives in glorious ignorant bliss riding bikes, hiking, kayaking, climbing and Twain knows what else – completely oblivious to the notion of what a ‘real’ winter is like. So before you complain to your friend that “Oh my God, it’s only a high...
Winter Brews: Our favorite seasonal ales

Winter Brews: Our favorite seasonal ales

By Derrick Peterman ANCHOR BREWING: Anchor Christmas Ale It’s a tradition that started at Anchor Brewing in 1975 when they released their Liberty Ale, which soon was named “Our Special Ale” during the winter holidays and today is sold as “Anchor Christmas Ale.” Each year, Anchor Brewing changes both the recipe and label artwork for this beer. The ingredients are a closely held company secret, but it’s usually a dark, malty, nutty tasting ale, with notes of holiday spices like ginger, nutmeg, chocolate, and cinnamon added to the mix. Anchor won’t tell you what hops they use either, but typically it’s lightly hopped to add an earthy or fruity twist to the brew. SIERRA NEVADA: Celebration Ale Sierra Nevada is a brewery that has gone the opposite flavor direction from Anchor with their Celebration Ale, meaning the hops are front and center. Sierra Nevada uses Cascade, Centennial and...
Yosemite’s Dewey Point

Yosemite’s Dewey Point

A moderate winter trek with spectaclar vistas By Matt Johanson Distance: Seven miles Time: Four to six hours Difficulty: Easy to moderate Parking and trailhead: Badger Pass Ski Area, elevation 7,216 feet Highest point: Elevation 7,560 feet Best season: January through March Permits: None needed for day use but required for overnight travel; visit the Badger Pass A-frame rangers’ office Overview A marked, well-traveled trail leads to a spectacular viewpoint and an especially good view of El Capitan. The gentle route meanders through a peaceful meadow and forest before descending to the valley rim where visitors can see deep into the snow- capped backcountry. Return the same way or take a more challenging ridge variation back instead. This is a must for Yosemite winter enthusiasts. The ski trek Start east on the well-groomed Glacier Point Road, climbing gently and then descending at Summit Meadow. About a mile from the parking...
Liquid Imagery: Mavericks

Liquid Imagery: Mavericks

Mavericks as seen through the lens of Dave “Nelly” Nelson For more images from Dave “Nelly” Nelson, go to www.AdventureSportsJournal.com/Nelly Late drop at Mavs. Grant “Twiggy” Baker on a monster wave. “Skindog” Collins looking into an inside barrel....
Liquid Imagery

Liquid Imagery

Mavericks as seen through the lens of Dave “Nelly” Nelson For more images from Dave “Nelly” Nelson, go to www.AdventureSportsJournal.com/Nelly Late drop at Mavs. Grant “Twiggy” Baker on a monster wave. “Skindog” Collins looking into an inside barrel....
Salty Dogs

Salty Dogs

The Salton Sea becomes a hidden gem for winter paddlers Rounding Mullet Island. Words and Photos by Charles Graham A dark wind line rose across the Salton Sea in southeastern California. Before we could seek refuge on Mullet Island, we were engulfed by frigid whitecaps. It was a 3-mile slog to the craggy, bird guano-covered islet. After dragging our kayaks and standup paddleboards on the leeward side of Mullet Island, we ducked inside the only manmade structure left on the isle, a bunker-like, roofless cubicle that acted as a much needed windbreak against the winter chill. We shivered while searching our maps for a decent campsite. We were in the midst of exploring California’s largest lake and much of its 110 miles of briny shoreline. Our excursion at a stall, it seemed fairly bleak at that moment with five salt-crusted paddlers attempting to keep warm. Filling the Sink Camping on...
To the Rescue

To the Rescue

Shawn Alladio pioneered big wave safety techniques Words by Neil Pearlberg • Photos by David F. Pu’u   Shawn Alladio is a hero that few have heard of. A soft-spoken mother of two, her company K38 Water Safety has been responsible for saving the lives of big wave surfing competitors for over 20 years. In that time she has developed and taught cutting-edge techniques for personal watercraft (PWC) rescue for both big wave and tow-in surfing. All twenty-four surfers awaiting the 2013/2014 big wave surf contest at Mavericks acknowledge that if they get burned by some of the world’s meanest waves, K38 Water Safety may be the only hope they have. K38’s use of the rescue board attached to the stern section of the jetski has proven to be the standard of the industry in extricating victims in big, potentially deadly surf. It was after the death of Mark Foo...
Ski Resort Primer

Ski Resort Primer

The lowdown on some of our favorite resorts Sugar Bowl ALPINE MEADOWS: A local favorite Alpine Meadows’ seven powder bowls, summit-to-base groomed slopes, and authentic hospitality are among the many attributes that have made the resort a favorite of the local community and visitors alike. Alpine Meadows offers skiers and riders access to more than 100 trails across 2,400 skiable acres serviced by 13 lifts. With its high annual snowfall, the resort boasts one of Tahoe’s longest skiing and boarding seasons. www.skialpine.com BEAR VALLEY: The friendliest mountain in the west Bear Valley Mountain is located in the Central Sierra between Yosemite and Lake Tahoe on National Scenic Byway Highway 4. Bear Valley is known for its warm, welcoming staff, affordable ticket prices, a variety of terrain, and a commitment to providing the ultimate mountain experience. The ski and board area offers 1,680 acres of varied terrain, more than 70 trails,...
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