Issue 86

Editor’s Note: Some Pig

Editor’s Note: Some Pig

Eating less meat and loving the outdoors Matt Niswonger on the Flume Trail in Tahoe. Like a lot of kids I was introduced to the book Charlotte’s Web while sitting cross-legged on the carpet and listening to my teacher’s soothing voice. The book held my attention. Was Wilbur the smart pig going to get sold and eaten? Even though I really connected to the story, I made the decision that eating pork was OK because pigs don’t talk to geese in real life and after all, Charlotte’s Web is just a silly farmyard story. Decades later I was waiting in line at the DMV and I clicked on a video that showed up in my Facebook feed. What I saw was a pig facility where thousands of pigs were laying in steel pens and nursing piglets as far as the eye could see. Normally I would have dismissed the...
Ear to the Ground: August / September 2015

Ear to the Ground: August / September 2015

Outdoor News and Notes for the California Region USA Cycling MTB Championships Enduro Pro Women podium. 1st (Gold) Jill Kintner, 2nd (Silver) Georgia Gould, 3rd (Bronze) Lauren Gregg, 4th Rachel Throop, 5th Amy Rambacher (Pierce Moran). Jill Kintner sweeps gravity disciplines at MTB championships Red Bull / Norco Bicycles pro rider Jill Kintner came out on top at the 2015 USA Cycling Mountain Bike National Championships at Mammoth Mountain in July, taking first place in all three gravity races: dual slalom, downhill and enduro. Kintner’s fellow champions include Chloe Woodruff (cross country and short track pro women) Aaron Gwin (downhill pro men), Mitch Ropelato (enduro pro men), Luca Cometti (dual slalom pro men), Howard Grotts (cross country pro men), and Russell Finsterwald (short track pro men). For the first time in five years, the same venue hosted all mountain bike disciplines during a single event. Mammoth Senior Vice President and...
EPiC: Save Our Shores – Saving the Beaches

EPiC: Save Our Shores – Saving the Beaches

 After nearly forty years Save Our Shores continues its heroic work By Leonie Sherman Passionfish restaurant volunteers care for Lover’s Point in Monterey as part of SOS’s Adopt A Beach program. Lots of people move to Santa Cruz to be near the ocean, but Rachel Kippen moved there to save it. After years of working on marine science and policy from Orange County to San Francisco Bay, she got frustrated talking about problems but not participating in solutions. “I wanted to be part of a group that did advocacy and education and accomplished measurable goals,” she explains. “Save Our Shores was the only logical choice.” Without the work of hundreds of Save Our Shores volunteers and dedicated staff, the pristine coast that millions of us love would be marred by oil derricks. There would be a few more tons of plastic pollution off-shore, and tens of thousands of school...
Descending Yosemite

Descending Yosemite

Dropping into Tenaya Canyon By Aron Bosworth, Outdoor Project Evaluating a ledge in the Inner Gorge. Photo: Aron Bosworth. Yosemite National Park is well known for the awe-inspiring granite formations that tower overhead, crooking the neck of visitors and drawing in climbers from around the globe. Lesser known, however, are some of the natural features that beckon from below. One such descending feature is the rugged chasm known as Tenaya Canyon, an infrequently travelled granitic trench of glacial-carved bowls and eroded gorges that connect the Yosemite Valley floor to the park’s high country at Tenaya Lake, by way of Tenaya Creek. As a canyoneering route, Tenaya Canyon is an exciting, demanding endeavor offering a level of solitude that is difficult to find in other areas of the park. Canyon descents provide unique perspectives on notable landmarks such as Half Dome, Clouds Rest, the Quarter Domes and Mount Watkins. The...
Dream Paddle

Dream Paddle

SUP around Lake Tahoe in nine days By Laura Norman Stand up paddlers enjoy the Lake Tahoe Water Trail along the East Shore near Cave Rock. Photo: Corey Rich / Aurora Photos. Stand up paddleboarding is one of the fastest growing watersports, and with its clear water and dramatic shoreline, Lake Tahoe is one of the premier paddling destinations. If you’re a SUP enthusiast, why not circumnavigate the lake this summer? It’s just 72 miles around the lake, so you can do it in stages over a few days with a willing driver to help. Even if you don’t have time to go all the way around the lake, any of these suggested routes will make for a great day on the water. Keep in mind that although the weather in Tahoe is generally nice in the summer, the wind usually kicks up by 11am so it’s best if you...
Liquid Imagery: Matt Becker

Liquid Imagery: Matt Becker

Matt Becker By Nelly Hometown: Santa Barbara     Stance: Regular     Specialty: Big Waves Sponsors: COVA Clothing, Futures Fins, Pro-lite, Bark Surfboards, Surftech, Maui Jim, Buell Wetsuits Favorite waves: Rincon, Sunset Beach, East Point, Ocean Beach, Mavericks Goals: Not to get scared out of big wave surfing. Surf Jaws on a proper swell and backdoor that terrifying west bowl. Qualify for the Mavericks contest one day. Learn how to avoid doing wheelie airs … and have a good time doing it! Your scariest wave: My scariest wave was one I shared with Pat Gudauskus this last year at Mavericks on December 20. I had ridden a bunch of waves already and had wanted to get a bigger one, and was “in the zone” as they say. I saw the one I wanted right after paddling out from another wave, turned around really deep, and paddled for it. I just barely made it...
Women Who Rock the Boat

Women Who Rock the Boat

California Women’s Watersports Collective gains momentum By Haven Livingston Melissa DeMarie powers down Bald Rock on the Middle Fork Feather River. Photo: Eric Petlock. The first thoughts Melissa DeMarie had after landing a 20 foot waterfall on a low brace and feeling her shoulder pop out were certainly not, “Oh, I think I’ll use my down time to create a nonprofit for women’s watersports.” She was kayaking in Chile and as anybody who has traveled for sport knows, the big bummer of seeing your trip cut short by injury was first and foremost in her head, but as healing time extended, she knew she had to do something else. “I moped around for a few months, but then realized that I had had this idea for starting up a women’s community group and it seemed like a good way to channel my energy and give back to the sport,”...
Lone Pine Peak

Lone Pine Peak

In praise of moderate rock By Leonie Sherman Mt. Whitney and Lone Pine Peak, winter sunrise. Photo: Andy Selters. There’s not much that can convince me to skip out on eight days of High Sierra cross-country rambling. But when Brandon offered to climb the North Ridge of Lone Pine Peak with me, I only needed about  30 seconds to abandon my plans and submit to the siren call of the mountain. Every High Sierra climbing book raves about this “super mega ultra classic” route and I’d been denied twice already. If you’re escaping the congested freeways and snarling humans of Southern California, the sight of bulky Lone Pine Peak heralds your arrival in the Land of Big Mountains. Rising straight out of the barren desert, the peak’s lower flanks start in dusty hills and culminate in crenelated granite and fluted spires. Looming over the town that shares it name,...
Popular for a Reason

Popular for a Reason

Hiking the ultra classic route from Echo Lakes to Barker Pass Photos and story by Dave Zook Anthony Santos executes a fine trundle with Cracked Crag in the background. “What has been will be again, what has been done will be done again; there’s nothing new under the sun.” While this biblical refrain from the Old Testament may have been written to touch upon the cyclical nature of human life and injustice, it is also a good description of the vast majority of Lake Tahoe outdoor adventures. Virtually everything that can be hiked, biked, skied, run or climbed in the Tahoe area already has been. Ever since the 1960 Olympics, there has been an explosion in tourism with athletic-minded individuals making the Tahoe pilgrimage to test themselves in the outdoors. The fiercest and fittest guys and gals still push farther into remote areas and achieve firsts, but for the...
A Votre Santé

A Votre Santé

How mountain biking trails benefit communities Compiled by Michele Lamelin Mendocino is one of many California communities discovering the significant benefits of a healthy, sustainable trail system (Called to Creation). As mountain biking continues to grow in popularity, communities are rapidly discovering the many benefits of a healthy, sustainable trail system. Community involvement in the natural environment gives people a reason to care about environmental conservation and stewardship, and engages them in the beauty of our public lands. Mountain biking and stewardship provide a positive experience of personal achievement and confidence, health and fitness for adults and children alike, and offer excellent opportunities for families to connect. Well-designed and maintained trails are an increasingly recognized tourism asset, attracting visitors who come to ride, eat, shop and stay. Read on about how mountain biking and healthy trails have benefited communities throughout California. Photo: Folsom Auburn Trail Riders Action Coalition. Auburn...
X
- Enter Your Location -
- or -