Inbox: Issue 96

Inbox: Issue 96

Fanmail, Feedback, Ideas & Opinions In response to Editor’s Note #95: The Carbon Cancer Put the Climate First I have been reading Adventure Sports Journal for several years now and have been following the “A Ripple in the Force” and the subsequent Editor’s Note “The Carbon Cancer.” I could not agree with you more in regard to having to address President Trump’s dangerous political agenda, specifically as it deals with climate change. I started a group in South Lake Tahoe called the Tahoe Climate Action Network (facebook.com/TahoeClimateChangeActionNetwork), ran for the local utility district board on a climate change platform (facebook.com/NickExlineTahoe), and recently a collaborative group has put together a program in which South Lake Tahoe will commit to receiving 100% of our electricity from renewable sources by 2030. Barring any unforeseen event we anticipate having an approval on this objective, in addition to other sustainability measures very soon. We have...
Ear to the Ground: Issue 96

Ear to the Ground: Issue 96

News & Notes Climbing Pioneer Royal Robbins Dies at 82 Royal Robbins, legendary rock-climbing pioneer, died March 14 at the age of 82. As an early proponent of pitonless climbing, Royal was instrumental in inspiring a new generation of ethical, low-impact climbers. He was especially known for his first ascents in Yosemite. He authored Basic Rockcraft and Advanced Rockcraft, and founded outdoor apparel company Royal Robbins with his wife Liz Robbins. After developing arthritis in 1978, Royal went on to become an established adventure kayaker. Endangered Species Act at Risk In the current political climate the Endangered Species Act (ESA) is at risk. The Act, signed in 1973, was designed to protect critically imperiled species from extinction. In December, Rep. Bishop (R-Utah), chairman of the House Natural Resources Committee, stated “I would be happy to invalidate the Endangered Species Act.” A February hearing to “modernize” the ESA included criticism...
Armchair Adventure: Issue 95

Armchair Adventure: Issue 95

Armchair Adventure New School Guide to Northern California Whitewater by Dan Menten Menten’s new guide book has been in the works for over eight years. It includes 135 run descriptions, GIS-generated precision maps, fun stories, and photos. Menten has run all but three of the reaches in the book so you can be sure that he has personally fact-checked every detail. This is the first guidebook to come out of this region in over 20 years and is by far the most thorough. It captures the heart and soul of NorCal river culture and is a must-have for anyone interested in kayaking, rafting, or whitewater in general. Buy directly from Menten and he’ll even sign the book if you ask. newschoolpublications.com —Haven Livingston...
Contest: Who Am I?

Contest: Who Am I?

Answer this correctly for your chance to win an ENO hammock! I was a skate pro in the 1980s with a popular deck. After retiring as a pro skater, I went to college to study business. In 1994 I dropped out of college to start a major brand in a different action sports category. My action sports brand was purchased by a Dutch company in 2015. Can you name this athlete/entrepreneur? Bonus: Tell us why this person is a gamechanger. Who Am I? Issue #96 Can you name this athlete/entrepreneur?*Name* First Last Address Street Address Address Line 2 City State / Province / Region ZIP / Postal Code AfghanistanAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBrazilBruneiBulgariaBurkina...
Snowmaggedon 2017

Snowmaggedon 2017

A view from the trenches By Meghan Ochs Photo: Heavenly/Sarah Ackerson Every skier and rider dreams of the perfect powder day: epic turns, huge face shots and endless smiles as gravity floats you down the mountain. Once or twice in a lifetime, those dream days become dream seasons, full of seemingly endless fun with limitless and constant snowfall. In 2017, California experienced such a winter. Snowmageddon 2017, as many are calling it, has dumped record breaking amounts of snowfall on almost every single resort in the entire Sierra Nevada range. With more than twice the average amount of snow, the behind-the-scenes efforts to keep your favorite ski mountain operating this season has been heroic to say the least. Every time a major storm rolled through, all the snow that fell on parking lots and walking areas had to be cleared. Snow removal is grueling, dangerous work, and it requires...
Eastside Spring Skiing

Eastside Spring Skiing

A record snow year creates opportunities for backcountry bliss By Leonie Sherman Reaching the pass was a relief after 3,300 feet of climbing. Earning turns skiing up Gardisky Creek drainage (Daniel Kangas). Right now every river in California is a churning torrent, the desert is aflame with cacti blooms, and the foothills are carpeted in fluorescent green. But the Sierra Nevada Mountains are still buried beneath record setting snowpack. As long as the snow persists, those majestic mountains of light and wind are accessible only to the intrepid and dedicated. If you want to visit the high reaches of the Sierra Nevada anytime soon, you’ll need a pair of skis. Spring backcountry skiing in California’s fair weather range means leaving the tent door open to track the moon’s course through a starlit sky. It means lazy morning yoga waiting for the snow to soften. It means spying on white-tailed...
Athlete Profile: Chantel Astorga

Athlete Profile: Chantel Astorga

The limits of human endurance By Chris Van Leuven Chantel Astorga at 18,200’ on Denali’s (20,310’) Cassin Ridge after completing the Denali Diamond (Jewell Lund). Two-thousand-five-hundred feet up El Capitan,  a lone figure moves slowly up the wall, her headlamp flashing up and down as she looks for the next hand and foothold. It’s 2 a.m. on October 24, 2014. As carabiners and assorted hardware clank against the cliff, she stumbles onto a ledge where two people are sleeping. She’s been out of water for eight hours, and in front of her are several two-liter bottles clipped to the anchor near the team. She knows she could rouse them and ask, politely, for something to drink that would keep her going. But that’s not Chantel’s style. She pulls her gear carefully around them, takes a final look at the water, and climbs on. “At this point I was really...
Being Vegan

Being Vegan

Athletic perspectives on a plant-based diet By Julie Kanagy Hyland Fisher on the Downieville Classic course (Contributed). While the Paleo diet is all the rage for athletes, we rarely hear the perspectives of vegan athletes. In fact, there’s often confusion about exactly what it means to be vegan, so let’s clear that up first. Eating vegan means adhering to a diet that consists 100% of plant foods. This means no eggs, no dairy, and of course no flesh of any animal. Take a look around and you will find many athletes who not only survive, but thrive without consuming animal products. One such athlete is Rich Roll who chronicled his story of personal struggle, self-understanding, and redemption in his book Finding Ultra. As an amateur self-supported athlete, Roll came out of nowhere to place 11th in the 2008 Ultraman World Championships, and came back to place sixth in...
Legends of Yosemite

Legends of Yosemite

Tom Frost remembers the Golden Age Words by Chris Van Leuven Photos by Tom Frost / Aurora Photos October 30, 1964, after ten days of climbing, Tom Frost reaches the top of the North America Wall to complete the route’s first ascent (Royal Robbins). Yosemite Valley, September 1960. Royal Robbins, Joe Fitschen, Chuck Pratt and Tom Frost stand on a triangle-shaped ledge a few hundred feet up The Nose on El Capitan, setting their sights on making the second ascent of the route. To get there, they’ve scrambled up broken rock and ledges to the start of the route’s first pitch. Above them gleams 2,800 feet of glacier-polished, orange granite, sliced with black, dark gray and white streaks. Toward the top of the cliff’s highest point, a pink band of light touches the wall. An hour earlier, the team loaded up by the side of the road with hundreds...
California Whitewater

California Whitewater

 By Haven Livingston Dan Menten on Yager Creek (Phil Boyer). California is flowing with water – whitewater paddlers rejoice! Now the big question is: what should you paddle this spring and summer? We caught up with three experts to help answer this all-important question. CAUTION: Winter storms have changed many runs, and spring and summer flows will be bigger and colder than in years past. Use extreme caution when choosing a run, dress for immersion, and go with someone who knows the run at current flows. Above all, know your limits. Northern California with Dan Menten Dan Menten started whitewater kayaking 25 years ago on Idaho’s Payette River. After getting his start in slalom racing he moved west and has spent the past 17 years exploring NorCal’s secret wonderland of whitewater. Never underestimate Menten. He’s an underdog who shows up at downriver races having never seen the run and...
X
- Enter Your Location -
- or -