Contest: Who Am I?

Contest: Who Am I?

Who Am I? Answer this correctly for your chance to win ENO camping lights! • In 1972, I authored the now famous essay, “The Whole Natural Art of Protection” • “The father of clean climbing.”-Climbing Magazine- referred to my 1973 hammerless ascent of Half Dome with Galen Rowell and Dennis Hennek. This visionary ascent was featured on the cover of National Geographic and is widely credited for ushering in the modern standard for clean climbing. • My first ascent list includes Dark Star on Temple Crag, the longest alpine rock climb in the Sierra, V-Notch Couloir on Polemonium Peak, Ice Nine on Mt. Mendel, and the 2nd ascent of Ama Dablam in Nepal, to name a few. • I led the first continuous ski traverse of the 250-mile John Muir Trail in 1970. • I hold the current speed record for skiing the Sierra High Route: 50 miles and over...
Van Living: 13 Feet of Love

Van Living: 13 Feet of Love

Life with Olive By Lynn Kennen About a year ago I decided to change my life. I quit my reliable ‘normal’ job as the general manager of a restaurant in Tahoe City to be a nomadic guide for various adventure sports full time. I rented out my home in Tahoe City and moved into a succession of “van-life” vehicles: first a van, then a 4-Runner, and finally the 13-foot ’72 Bell travel trailer I call “Olive.” In those first several months with Olive, I lived, worked and played “on the road” throughout the western US, including mountain bike guiding in the Tahoe area with Tahoe Adventure Company, mountain bike and river guiding with Row Adventures in Idaho, Oregon and Washington, personal riding adventures in the Lost Sierra and Shasta areas, and my 12th annual trip to Burning Man. It wasn’t long before I realized I didn’t need much of...
Editor’s Note: The Carbon Cancer

Editor’s Note: The Carbon Cancer

Can we afford President Trump’s fossil fuel ambitions? Photo: Goddard Space Flight Center/NASA] ASJ co-founders Cathy Claesson and Matt Niswonger. After 16 years and 95 issues they are more committed to the adventure lifestyle than ever. In my last editor’s note I wrote about Donald Trump and the pros and cons of staying silent vs. taking a political stand. A few readers shared some pretty strong arguments for staying politically silent. After all, ASJ’s core mission is to unite California outdoor enthusiasts around a healthy, adventurous lifestyle. Given this, who cares whether you call yourself a Democrat, Republican or something else? However, for a variety of reasons – all outlined in the last issue – we cannot stay on the sidelines. Trump’s ambivalence towards climate change more than anything else has forced our hand. Simply put, rejecting science is unacceptable. The earth is round and burning fossil fuels is...
Inbox: Feb/March 2017

Inbox: Feb/March 2017

Fan mail, feedback, ideas & opinions Letters to the Editor In response to “A Ripple in the Force” in ASJ #94 We Must Push Back As for “toning down the politics,” I vote for you speaking the truth on social and environmental issues in the context of adventure/outdoors life here in California.  We don’t have the luxury of being non-polarizing or a-political. We must push back. ASJ is totally an appropriate platform for editorializing as far as I’m concerned. If readers are looking for a “pleasant escape from the realities of the world,” suggest that they climb on to a bike, board, trail, slope or rock. Ask your editors to let you speak. —Jeff M, Santa Barbara Resist the Trump Agenda I got ASJ at Get Fit Davis. Thank you for voicing your opinion about how bad our 45th president is, and for sure will be. Let’s never forget that...
Ear to the Ground: Feb/March 2017

Ear to the Ground: Feb/March 2017

News and Notes Squaw Valley Ski Patroller Dies in Accident Joe Zuiches, a 42 year-old resident of Olympic Valley and a member of the Squaw Valley professional ski patrol since 2012, was killed in a fatal accident prior to regularly scheduled operations, during avalanche control activities at the top of Gold Coast Ridge. The team at Squaw Valley/Alpine Meadows is deeply saddened by this tragic event, and ASJ extends our deepest sympathies to the family and friends affected. Joe will be survived by his wife and infant son. If you would like to make a charitable donation to the Zuiches family today, check out Joe’s GoFundMe page here. Photo: Contributed California Drought Update Pacific Institute reports that Pacific storms in January have brought widespread, intense precipitation to California, providing relief to some drought-stricken regions but also flooding. According to the US Drought Monitor, about 35 percent of the state...
A Beer Worth Earning

A Beer Worth Earning

Mendocino Brewing Red Tail Ale By Derrick Peterman When Mendocino Brewing’s Red Tail Ale hit the shelves over 30 years ago, it was a radically different beer during a time when light industrial lagers dominated the beer market. While a lot has changed in California’s beer landscape since then, this brew remains one of the classics. Amber ales aren’t always the most exciting beers in these days of über-hoppy IPAs and everything-but-the kitchen-sink brews you’ll find these days, but beers like Red Tail Ale are underrated. It’s drinkable, yet hardly boring. It’s complex, with its caramel character accented with deeply toasted malt note and an earthy finish. A radical brew when it debuted long ago, and pretty damn good today....
Weed’s Water War

Weed’s Water War

How residents of a small town at the foot of Mt. Shasta are fighting back against the bottled water industry By Leonie Sherman Mount Shasta from Weed’s Lake Street (Michael Yates). For 107 years, residents of Weed, California, a picturesque hamlet nestled against the flanks of snow-capped Mt. Shasta, have been drinking water from nearby Beaughan Spring. The water is so pure it flows straight to their faucets; no treatment is necessary. Locals take gallon jugs of it with them when they leave town. But Roseburg Forest Products, the Oregon-based timber giant that owns the land around the spring, has other uses for that pure water. Crystal Geyser already bottles Beaughan Spring water in Weed, and RFP wants to sell them even more. The timber company has told the 2,700 folks who call Weed home to find their water elsewhere. “No way,” says Michael Yates of Water for Citizens...
Death on Two Wheels

Death on Two Wheels

Exploring Death Valley National Park’s vast array of treasures By Leonie Sherman Entering the park along Highway 190 (Leonie Sherman). When rain lashes the coast, wind scours the desert and snow pounds the mountains, chances are the sun is shining somewhere in the largest national park in the continental US. Sixty-five miles an hour is the wrong speed to absorb Death Valley’s spectacular salt flats, sand dunes, canyons, valleys and mountains, but hundreds of miles of paved roads traverse the varied terrain. Get on a bike and find your park. Sparse vegetation throughout most of the park means the bones of the earth are laid bare and geology is on display. The 140-mile long rift that gives the park its name is a relatively flat ride, but four mountain ranges provide plenty of challenge for an ambitious rider. Start small, aim high, go big. That’s how I explored Death...
Stone Nudes

Stone Nudes

The story of Dean Fidelman’s evocative imagery By Chris Van Leuven “I look at my work as music. You like it or you don’t. It’s just my music that I make with my friends,” Dean “Bullwinkle” Fidelman tells Adventure Sports Journal from his modest home just west of Yosemite’s park gates. Today, 61-year-old Fidelman makes his art simply, passionately and without compromise — just like he did as a teenager in Southern California. In addition to making images of climbers sans clothing on rocks throughout the world, he also edits and collects historic climbing photos for coffee table books with his longtime friend John Long. These include: The Stonemasters: California Rock Climbers in the Seventies (2009); Stone Nudes: Art in Motion (2010), The Valley Climbers: Yosemite’s Vertical Revolution (2012); and Yosemite in the 50s: The Iron Age (2015). To date he’s published 18 Stone Nude calendars. In 2010 The Stonemasters:...
Earning Mount Tom

Earning Mount Tom

A worthy objective for Sierra ski mountaineers By Josh Pearlman Local mountain guide Howie Schwartz California dreamin’ in short sleeves (Peter Clark). Mount Tom is situated in the middle of the southern Sierra Nevada. This area – known simply as the “Eastside” – spans nearly 400 miles and boasts an impressive 21 designated Wilderness areas and two national parks. Just northwest of Bishop, as the Owens Valley begins a steep climb toward Mammoth Lakes, the 13,658-foot Mt. Tom becomes visible as it noticeably dominates all of the surrounding peaks. This peak, a must-do in the Eastside backcountry ski circuit, is named after Thomas Clark who bagged the summit sometime in the 1860s. It is unclear who first skied Mt. Tom, but based on the active scene there in the 1970s and 1980s, it was most likely done by Galen Rowell or Doug Robinson or someone in that group. Today,...
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