Issue 38

Getting into Adventure Racing

Getting into Adventure Racing

Photos by Doug Nurock/Nurock Photography By Gordon Wright  One of the most common questions people ask adventure racers is, “How do I get into adventure racing?” The short answer is: Keep hanging out with adventure racers. They’ll suck you into the sport eventually. The even-shorter answer is, “If you’re reading this, you can probably do it.” Todd Jackson, who runs 7th Wave Productions, the biggest local event organizer in adventure racing, says that anyone who has ever done an off-road triathlon has what it takes — athletically – to get into the sport. “Any reasonably fit recreational athlete can get into adventure racing,” says Jackson, who also promotes off-road tri’s and trail runs. “But there is a learning curve. You should start with a sprint race, and as you develop proficiency you can move up to longer races.” No matter if you’re considering a three-hour race – considered a “sprint”...
Why Don’t We Do It OFF THE ROAD?

Why Don’t We Do It OFF THE ROAD?

OFF-ROAD TRIATHLETES AND ADVENTURE RACERS KEEP EACH OTHER COMPANY By Aja Cook and Todd Jackson Adventure racers have long had an affinity for off-road triathlons as a way to lengthen their race season and build up individual event skills. Off- road triathlons such as the nationally recognized XTERRA series offer adventure racers an opportunity to cross train with challenging events when not participating in adventure races. Off-road triathlons and adventure races are sort of the fraternal twins of multi-sport racing; they don’t look exactly alike, but they share a lot of the same traits. In both types of events racers mountain bike and run on a variety of rugged terrain, take to the water for at least one leg and transition between events rapidly. On the other hand, there are some major differences between the two events. Most adventure races are run by two, three, or four-person teams, as opposed...
Nature Deficit Disorder

Nature Deficit Disorder

Warning: No Drugs Required, Just a Little Time Outside By Jedd Ferris It’s no secret that kids these days are seeing less green space and more screen space. A study by the Kaiser Family Foundation found that the average American child spends 44 hours per week—more than six hours a day—staring at some kind of electronic screen. According to the American Obesity Association approximately 30 percent of children between the ages 6 to 11 are overweight and 15 percent are obese. Richard Louv, author of Last Child in the Woods, refers to this growing problem as “nature deficit disorder.” He believes nature deficit disorder is causing more problems than just obesity. He argues that many mental and spiritual health problems facing kids and adolescents today stem from a lack of connection to the outdoors. Kids are so plugged into television shows and fixated on their Play Station 3s that they’re...
Sweating It

Sweating It

How will global warming affect outdoor recreation? By Graham Averill You want a bleak picture of the world ravaged by global warming? Forget “An Inconvenient Truth.” Watch “Soylent Green,” the ‘70s sci-fi thriller starring Charlton Heston that depicts a 2022 New York City ravaged by global warming. Al Gore may have melting ice caps, but Charlton Heston has us eating people in the form of green protein bars. “Soylent Green” may be fiction, but people eating each other and watching a lot of TV seems like a frighteningly realistic possibility of a planet ravaged by climate change. When the world gets hotter and our ecosystem dies because the atmosphere is so inhospitable, most Americans will just stay inside more. We’ll watch a lot of reality programs. Our baseball games will all be played inside domes. We’ll eat genetically engineered food and life will go on in our climate-controlled, air-purified futuristic...
A Deeper Shade of Green

A Deeper Shade of Green

The path to becoming a certified green business is easy With the proliferation of so-called “green” businesses in the news, we asked Molly Ober, Green Business Program Coordinator of the Monterey branch of the Bay Area Green Business Program, to explain how businesses are certified green and what being green really means. The program is a partnership of environmental agencies, utilities and nonprofit organizations that assist, recognize, and promote businesses and government agencies that operate in an environmentally responsible way. This collaborative effort provides motivated businesses and agencies an easy-to-use framework for improving their environmental performance. ASJ: From your perspective, do you think that going green reflects a national lifestyle shift or is it just another trendy marketing ploy? Molly: Going green reflects a national lifestyle shift, people are realizing the urgency to protect and preserve our natural resources. Many believe 2007 is a watershed year in the business trend...
ASJ’s Green Guide

ASJ’s Green Guide

Green guide content produced in conjunction with blue ridge outdoors magazine through the outdoor adventure media partnership. Legislation to Watch With a swing in the Congressional majority and an increasingly eco-conscious American public, several pieces of progressive environmental legislation may finally reach the floor for a vote. Here are six recently introduced bills that, if passed, could go a long way to protecting the land we love, the water we drink, and the air we breathe. 1 Roadless Area Conservation Rule Introduced by Senators John Warner and Jim Webb from Virginia, this bi-partisan bill introduced in the House and Senate would permanently protect 58.5 million acres of America’s premiere public land. Since the Clinton Administration adopted the Roadless Rule in 2001, the U.S. Forest Service has received more than 4.2 million public comments supporting permanent protection of these remote areas. However, one of the first acts of the Bush Administration...
Take it to the River

Take it to the River

A Playboating Primer for Budding Kayakers By Geoff Jennings Playboating is a sub-discipline of whitewater kayaking that focuses on doing tricks and maneuvers in the river. It can take many forms, from the casual boater doing a stern squirt, to spending an hour cutting up a wave on the way down the river, to dedicated play missions, where challenging a specific play feature is the entire goal for the day. Playboating can be done on flatwater and in eddylines, as well as on waves and in holes. For many kayakers, perfecting increasingly complex tricks becomes the focus of their paddling. For others, it’s merely a challenging diversion to mess around with on the river. But no matter what your focus in paddling is, time spent experimenting with playboating will improve your boat-handling and paddle skills, increase physical strength and up your confidence in all facets of paddling. Ending up in...
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