Sitting Down with Jaimal Yogis

Sitting Down with Jaimal Yogis

Author expands on his background, the film version of Saltwater Buddha and his thoughts on surf localism By Pete Gauvin Photo by Dan Rebert, danrebert.com The first chapter of San Francisco author Jaimal Yogis’ book, Saltwater Buddha: A Surfer’s Quest to Find Zen on the Sea, is about running away from his home in Sacramento at age 16 with a one-way ticket to Hawaii. His adventure didn’t last long but it left lasting impressions. Yogis, now 30, sat down with me recently at the Java Beach Cafe in view of San Francisco’s Ocean Beach. He talked about his background, how he nearly became a Buddhist monk, how he came to write his book and the effort to turn it into a film. We also discussed his evolving perceptions on surf localism, the subject of his book chapter, “Surf Nazis Have Buddha-Nature Too,” excerpted in the issue. Yogis had an unorthodox...
Kayaking Lake Tahoe, Simple and Care Free

Kayaking Lake Tahoe, Simple and Care Free

Even a casual kayaker can circumnavigate Big Blue with a little pluck, common sense and an early start By Robert Frohlich Photo by North Lake Tahoe/Tom Zikas Call me Ishmael. For I, too, am occasionally drawn toward making spirited voyages. Each spring I circumnavigate Lake Tahoe in my kayak. The point of paddling around Tahoe’s 72 miles of shoreline isn’t to get from A to B, but to find something, face something, and to spit in the eye of Father Time. Of course the scenery isn’t bad either. There’s no better way of experiencing Tahoe’s waters than by kayak: You commingle with a smorgasbord of lake life typically missed on larger craft — from bald eagles along Rubicon’s shoreline nesting in the tops of dead pine trees; the fish-eating white bellied plumage of osprey hawks; the huge stands of Whitebark Pine and masses of Mariposa Lillies and Pussypaws that surround...
The Otto Route — An Audacious Variation of a Trans-Sierra Ski Classic

The Otto Route — An Audacious Variation of a Trans-Sierra Ski Classic

Veteran High Route guide Doug Robinson and company pay tribute to the long, lost tracks of Otto Steiner Story and photos by Doug Robinson Jay Kumar on the sweet East Ridge of Midway Mountain. This was the opening move, where our Otto Route veered of the classic Sierra High Route. We’re backing down the north face of Mt. Stanford, kicking soft, loose steps, and I’m scared. Not that Michael Thomas, right above me, will lose it and take me out on his way down – though that’s possible. This one, crossing over the last huge peak, was supposed to be easy. Instead, it went vertical breaching the cornice, and the steepness below, pretty unrelenting, still makes me squirm. Clearly, that photo we were banking on was taken somewhere else. An unsettling question lurks in the depths. Will it slide? Will the whole face sigh as it submits to gravity, crumpling...
The Bay and Anywhere the Wind Blows

The Bay and Anywhere the Wind Blows

OCSC Founder Anthony Sandberg has been teaching people to sail — and set sail — for 31 years By Pete Gauvin  •  Photos by Martin Sundberg Sailing on San Francisco Bay is one of the iconic adventures of Northern California, combining a maritime wilderness amid a jewel-like urban setting with a robust natural wind generator that pumps out stiff breezes as reliably as Tim Lincecum unleashes a heater, which is to say nearly all the time — or in the bay’s case, nearly every day. Yet it’s likely many more people have been to a San Francisco Giants game to see “The Freak” pitch than have been sailing on the bay, a freak of nature in its own right. While millions scurry daily along the shores and across the bridges of this 400-square-mile inland sea, far too few ever get out on the water. It may be the defining landmark...
Pelagic Pioneer Sean Van Sommeran

Pelagic Pioneer Sean Van Sommeran

A three-hour and 20-year tour with the founder of the Pelagic Shark Research Foundation Story by Bruce Willey • Photos courtesy of Pelagic Shark Research Foundation Shark sniffs camera at Año Nuevo Island. Photo by Callaghan Fritz-Cope/PSRF The January sky is a cold slab of gray, wet with fog, that settles deep into the bone. Nearly a half-mile off Año Nuevo Island, 25 miles north of Santa Cruz, Sean Van Sommeran, founder and executive director of the Pelagic Shark Research Foundation, kills the motor. We drift and wait. Fifteen pounds of elephant seal meat wrapped in a mesh bag off the back of the boat sends a faint, greasy streak across the surface of the water. Año Nuevo has long been a breeding ground for seals, sea lions, and the infamous North American elephant seal, an impressive apex predator in its own right about the size of a grizzly bear....
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